Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Autofire

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    324
    Downloads
    9
    Uploads
    3

    Default Autofire

    One of the rules which seems to split opinion in BRP is the autofire rule.

    Inspired by the rule I saw in a game of SLA

    Calculate chance to hit as usual(+5% per extra shot but no more than double skill)
    Then roll
    If roll is less than modified skill but more than skill - one shot hits
    If less than skill - then half burst hits (or roll as per RAW
    If less than special for skill (not modified skill) all shots in burst hit
    Rule Zero: Don't be on fire

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    City of the Sons of the Yew aka Eboracum
    Posts
    843
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    117
    Uploads
    9

    Default

    I adapted some ideas from GDW RPG's and the Stargate d20. Basically you have full auto area fire (which fills a "volume" with shots and requires fear checks / will power rolls for those in the volume not to dive for cover and if they stay exposed they risk getting hit by random shots) and then controlled burst fire in either wide bursts (makes it easier to hit a target by spraying shots at an area, but unlikely to land multiple shots) and narrow bursts (harder to hit the target but more likely to land multiple shots). There was a write up on the web at one point - I may republish them in Uncounted Worlds at some point.

    Not sure it's particularly realistic as a system but I've found it a playable system for a variety of BRP games...

    Nick
    My friends and I walked the Coast to Coast last summer for Meningitis UK - thanks to everyone who donated, we raised £2,544.50
    Uncounted Worlds
    Outpost 19 SF Adventure for BRP

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Worlds of Wonder
    Posts
    744
    Blog Entries
    4
    Downloads
    153
    Uploads
    10

    Default

    The system we distilled over the years as our preferred mix of realism and playability was relatively simple. Firing at a single target, you used the RoF or rounds-per-burst (e.g 10 or 3, respectively) as a dice to roll for the number of rounds that hit with a successful attack - that would be a D10 or a D3. Only the first hit could critical or special. Each hit was resolved as a separate attack, except with super-rapid-fire bursts which would all hit the same location (each hit still had to overcome armour, though).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Reading UK
    Posts
    256
    Downloads
    5
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I just use the % rolled on the dice as the number of shots that hit. EG: If a burst is 5 rounds and you roll 45% then 2 rounds (45% of 5 rounded down) hit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    27
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vile View Post
    Only the first hit could critical or special. Each hit was resolved as a separate attack, except with super-rapid-fire bursts which would all hit the same location (each hit still had to overcome armour, though).
    Right, and this is the issue I've been dealing with over the last week or so -- a vehicle-mounted minigun, which fires 33 rounds per attack (all autofire, no "controlled" bursts). My feeling was, on a successful hit, to roll 3d10+3 for the number of hits, then roll 2d6+4 once as the standardised damage for all hits in that attack.

    !i!
    "It is utterly urgent for resistance movements and those of us who support them to reclaim the space for civil disobedience. To do this we will have to liberate ourselves from being manipulated, perverted, and headed off in the wrong direction by the desire to feed the media's endless appetite for theater." - Arundhati Roy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sandy Eggo
    Posts
    543
    Downloads
    23
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AikiGhost View Post
    I just use the % rolled on the dice as the number of shots that hit. EG: If a burst is 5 rounds and you roll 45% then 2 rounds (45% of 5 rounded down) hit.
    I think this is the most straightforward. Gives better gunners/riflemen a better chance at scoring more hits, as well as using various bonuses (such as computer targeting) to get better results, and applying a spray fire rule (usually a negative modifier) to reduce the number of hits but allow for more individual targets.

    Ian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Somewhere in the EU
    Posts
    1,532
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    70
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Aiki's idea is perfect, but it would require some calculation, however. 23% of 7 is a calculation many players will not be willing to make during play.

    BRP Mecha will use a standard burst of 10 rounds, and the number of rounds that hit is 10% of the actual die roll (1 hit for 1-10, 2 hits for 11-20, etc.). There will probably be some variation for special successes, but we will choose the actual one after playtest. Most mechas use autofire weapons, but the actual rate of fire of weapons is rarely described, and they hardly ever shoot at multiple targets.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8
    Downloads
    1
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I agree that Aiki's method is precise, but time-consuming. It also loses some traction at the lower ROF values - what if you have a weapon with an ROF of 2 - you need to roll '00' to hit with both rounds? Maybe we need to be rounding up, so that values from 01 to whatever qualify to hit with one round without resorting to "no fewer than one" rulings?

    Doing so gives us these sorts of scenarios:

    I'm a strong marksman (100% with pistols) and my ROF is 2. I have a 50% chance of hitting you with both rounds (roll 51-00)

    I'm an above average marksman (60% with pistols) and my ROF is 2. I have a 1 in 10 change of hitting you with both (roll 51-60) - one sixth of the time when I do manage to hit.

    I'm a novice marksman (30% with pistols) and my ROF is 2. I have literally no chance to hit you with that second round - I'm a poor enough shot that I need an ROF of 4 to have a shot at hitting with a second bullet, and even that only happens on 26-30

    Realistic? Anyone?

    If so, we can solve the complexity issue with cheat sheets. Figure out the likely numbers of rounds that will be fired from the weapons in your game and create a cross-reference for the impacted player. Guy with an AF7 weapon would need to know where his breakpoints were (15 to hit with 2, 29 to hit with 3, 43 to hit with 4, 58 for 5, 72 for 6 and 86 to hit with all 7)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sandy Eggo
    Posts
    543
    Downloads
    23
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Rampant Gamer View Post
    I agree that Aiki's method is precise, but time-consuming. It also loses some traction at the lower ROF values - what if you have a weapon with an ROF of 2 - you need to roll '00' to hit with both rounds? Maybe we need to be rounding up, so that values from 01 to whatever qualify to hit with one round without resorting to "no fewer than one" rulings?

    Doing so gives us these sorts of scenarios:

    I'm a strong marksman (100% with pistols) and my ROF is 2. I have a 50% chance of hitting you with both rounds (roll 51-00)

    I'm an above average marksman (60% with pistols) and my ROF is 2. I have a 1 in 10 change of hitting you with both (roll 51-60) - one sixth of the time when I do manage to hit.

    I'm a novice marksman (30% with pistols) and my ROF is 2. I have literally no chance to hit you with that second round - I'm a poor enough shot that I need an ROF of 4 to have a shot at hitting with a second bullet, and even that only happens on 26-30

    Realistic? Anyone?

    If so, we can solve the complexity issue with cheat sheets. Figure out the likely numbers of rounds that will be fired from the weapons in your game and create a cross-reference for the impacted player. Guy with an AF7 weapon would need to know where his breakpoints were (15 to hit with 2, 29 to hit with 3, 43 to hit with 4, 58 for 5, 72 for 6 and 86 to hit with all 7)
    Or, instead of rounding up, you could simply rule that a successful roll has to generate at least one hit (which makes sense, since a successful roll "hits"), and the subsequent application of AikiGhost's houserule is the number of additional projectiles that hit (rounded normally).

    So, with a ROF of two, a successful roll of 49 or less indicates a single strike (automatically one hits with a successful roll), and 50 and higher indicates both hit. This also allows critical hits and specials to not become overly devastating unless you have a high ROF and a very skilled shooters.

    Ian

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8
    Downloads
    1
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vagabond View Post
    Or, instead of rounding up, you could simply rule that a successful roll has to generate at least one hit (which makes sense, since a successful roll "hits"), and the subsequent application of AikiGhost's houserule is the number of additional projectiles that hit (rounded normally).

    So, with a ROF of two, a successful roll of 49 or less indicates a single strike (automatically one hits with a successful roll), and 50 and higher indicates both hit. This also allows critical hits and specials to not become overly devastating unless you have a high ROF and a very skilled shooters.
    As I believe we'd both get the same results, I heartily concur. Think I'll adopt this ruling for the next game I run that it's relevant for.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •